France Communes – Val De Moder http://val-de-moder.org/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 18:57:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://val-de-moder.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/Val-De-Moder-icon-150x150.jpg France Communes – Val De Moder http://val-de-moder.org/ 32 32 Cllr McCormack represented the region at the French event https://val-de-moder.org/cllr-mccormack-represented-the-region-at-the-french-event/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 18:57:59 +0000 https://val-de-moder.org/cllr-mccormack-represented-the-region-at-the-french-event/ Cllr Vinny McCormack signing the Châteaubriant twinning Published: Sun Sep 18, 2022 7:57 PM Last update: Sun Sep 18, 2022 7:58 PM Twenty-seven years ago, a twinning relationship was established between Athlone and the French town of Châteaubriant. Last weekend, the Mayor of the Municipal Borough of Athlone Moate, Ballymore man Cllr Vinny McCormack, met […]]]>

Cllr Vinny McCormack signing the Châteaubriant twinning

Twenty-seven years ago, a twinning relationship was established between Athlone and the French town of Châteaubriant.

Last weekend, the Mayor of the Municipal Borough of Athlone Moate, Ballymore man Cllr Vinny McCormack, met the Mayor of Châteaubriant and the President of the Community of Communes of Châteaubriant-Derval, Alain Hunault to renew the twinning between the two municipalities.

Cllr McCormack was joined by Deputy Mayor Cllr Frankie Keena, District Manager Jackie Finney, Athlone Town Twinning Committee Chairman Niamh Dalby and a delegation from the Town Twinning Committee.

The visit to the twinning coincided with the Foire De Béré in Châteaubriant, a historic fair that has taken place every year since 1050.

Cllr McCormack and members of the Athlone twinning committee were welcomed by the Mayor of Chateaubriant on Friday September 9th at a reception to celebrate 27 years of twinning between Athlone and Chateaubriant.

The event also celebrated 40 years of twinning between Radevormwald in Germany and Châteaubriant and the three delegations reflected on the importance of creating links between communities, cities and regions in Europe.

On Saturday September 10, Cllr McCormack and the Athlone delegation attended the inauguration of the De Béré Fair.

The fair is considered one of the oldest in France and its origins officially date back to 1050. It takes place over four days and attracts 40 to 50,000 visitors for agricultural and commercial exhibitions on a 10 hectare site.

Cllr McCormack said he was honored to represent Athlone and expressed his gratitude to Mayor Hunault and all of his officials.

Cllr McCormack was happy to try this vintage tractor during the delegation’s attendance at a major agricultural fair held annually since 1040.

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Orange gives the green light to the dismantling of copper telephone lines in France https://val-de-moder.org/orange-gives-the-green-light-to-the-dismantling-of-copper-telephone-lines-in-france/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 05:00:31 +0000 https://val-de-moder.org/orange-gives-the-green-light-to-the-dismantling-of-copper-telephone-lines-in-france/ State-controlled telephone company Orange has been allowed to start removing copper wires in some municipalities from the end of 2024, with the whole country to be disconnected by 2030. Orange must work with other suppliers Initial plans to remove all copper telephone wires were criticized by other operators, including SFR, Free and Bouygues Telecom, as […]]]>

State-controlled telephone company Orange has been allowed to start removing copper wires in some municipalities from the end of 2024, with the whole country to be disconnected by 2030.

Orange must work with other suppliers

Initial plans to remove all copper telephone wires were criticized by other operators, including SFR, Free and Bouygues Telecom, as being too slow and giving Orange a commercial advantage in switching to fiber optics.

Regulator Arcep has asked Orange to respond and has now approved the plan, with minor adjustments, to ensure that all operators are consulted commune by commune as the dismantling proceeds.

Read more: Unhappy mobile and fiber customers after rapid deployment in France

Most copper connections are in rural France

Only municipalities fully connected to the fiber optic network will be in the first wave of disconnections.

About 20 million households in France still have wired copper connections, used for fixed telephony, ADSL internet and telephony.

Orange claims that 70% of the population already has access to the more modern fiber optic wires installed on telephone sets – but this figure skims over the fact that most of the remaining 30% live in a vast swath of rural areas.

More money to install fiber

Local authorities are responsible for providing fiber optic cable to rural communities, but many have fallen far behind.

Parts of southern Charente, for example, which were first told they would be connected in 2017 and then it would be by the end of 2021, have now been told there is no date for the date on which they will be connected.

There is no more money from the ministry for the deployment of fiber optics.

A deadline of 2025 to cover the entire department has been set in 2019.

Orange reassures municipalities with copper wires

A spokesperson for Orange told La Connexion that people who still have copper wires and no date for installing fiber optic connections in their towns shouldn’t worry.

“Nothing will be done to cut the copper line until there are alternatives in place,” he said.

“In the vast majority of places the alternative will be fiber optic cable connections, but in a few hard-to-reach areas we may have to go through 4G or 5G mobile phone connections, which will be significantly faster. than ADSL.”

Fiber optic lines are better for the environment

Orange says the end of the copper-wire telephone network in France will save the company 500 million euros a year.

He says fiber-optic equipment is more robust in stormy weather, although in most areas he shares old telephone sets with copper wires.

In homes, fiber optic connections provide a way to get reliable television or movie streaming services over the Internet that ADSL lines cannot.

Internet connections should also be much faster and easier to use. There are also environmental benefits, says Orange.

He claims that Internet connections using fiber optic lines use less than 0.5 watts of electricity per line, while ADSL connections use 1.8 watts.

Orange criticized for poor maintenance of remaining wires

Opponents of phasing out copper too quickly say it has big advantages in rural areas, especially since phones connected to it continue to work during power cuts.

Fiber optic phones must be connected through boxes that must be plugged into a household’s electrical system.

Last year Orange, which had the legal responsibility to maintain copper wire telephone service until every home in France had an alternative, was strongly criticized by Arcep for letting it fall into disrepair. .

Its legal obligation ended this year, but the firm promises to maintain maintenance until at least next year until alternative solutions are put in place.

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New ‘opt in’ stickers tested in France to reduce spam waste https://val-de-moder.org/new-opt-in-stickers-tested-in-france-to-reduce-spam-waste/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 07:56:27 +0000 https://val-de-moder.org/new-opt-in-stickers-tested-in-france-to-reduce-spam-waste/ Residents of 11 areas across four regions of France will now be able to ‘opt in’ to receiving advertising material at home as part of a new three-year trial to reduce waste and waste collection costs. If successful, the trial will be expanded to three additional areas in February 2023. To participate, residents of these […]]]>

Residents of 11 areas across four regions of France will now be able to ‘opt in’ to receiving advertising material at home as part of a new three-year trial to reduce waste and waste collection costs.

If successful, the trial will be expanded to three additional areas in February 2023. To participate, residents of these areas must put a sticker on their mailbox that reads “Oui pub” (yes to advertising) to indicate that they agree to receive unaddressed leaflets, catalogs and other commercial documents.

The “Yes pub” system will replace the “Stop pub” stickers, which means residents will participate rather than not.

The aim is to reduce the amount of unwanted advertising material and paper that people receive and then inevitably have to throw away, often without even reading it.

The trial is expected to last three years and, if successful, will be rolled out across the country.

In total, approximately 2.5 million inhabitants are concerned, the areas participating in the experiment being located in Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, New-Aquitaine, Provence-Alpes-Côte-d’Azur and Corsica.

The device was first voted in the framework of the “climate and resilience” law of August 2021 according to an idea suggested by the Citizen’s Convention for the Climate (CCC).

The main objectives are to reduce waste from individual homes and to reduce the costs of waste collection and treatment in municipalities. The idea of ​​the CCC said that the system would also help to “regulate advertising to stop the incentives for over-consumption”.

In theory, companies and other distributors of the material will be prohibited from depositing mail in mailboxes that do not bear the “Oui pub” sticker.

Nearly 900,000 tonnes of printed matter

According to a report by the Environment and Energy Management Agency (Ademe), “more than 894,000 tons of unaddressed advertising [were distributed in 2019] a large part of which was thrown away without being read, ”said the Ministry of Ecology.

Shops and businesses have started distributing “Oui pub” stickers to neighborhood residents to encourage them to stick them on their letterboxes and opt in to the new system. Posters have also started going up, with QR codes that allow residents to order their own stickers.

The new regime will be judged on its success by four factors:

  • Environmental impact – Does it change the amount of print advertising that is thrown away and the amount of paper used?
  • Economic impact – Does it allow municipalities to save money on waste collection or does it negatively impact those who would otherwise distribute the material?
  • Behavioral impact – Are people embracing measurement and changing their behavior towards other forms of advertising such as signing up for digital newsletters instead?
  • Understanding, adoption and satisfaction – How many people are using the new system, is it popular, is the community happy with it?

The “Stop pub” sticker was created in 2004.

The complete list of municipalities or waste disposal groups testing the system from September 1:

  • Alpes-de-Haute-Provence – Ubaye Valley Serre-Ponçon.
  • Alpes-Maritimes – UNIVALOM (Joint Syndicate for the treatment and recovery of waste from the city of Antibes).
  • Ardèche – SICTOBA (Intermunicipal union for the collection and treatment of household waste in Lower Ardèche).
  • Ardèche and Drôme – SYTRAD (Ardèche Drôme waste treatment union).
  • Haute-Garonne – City of Ramonville-Saint-Agne.
  • Gironde – City of Bordeaux.
  • Gironde – SMICVAL (Joint intermunicipal collection and recovery association Libournais Haute Gironde).
  • Isère – Grenoble Alpes Métropole.
  • Lot-et-Garonne – Agglomeration of Agen.
  • Meurthe-et-Moselle – Metropolis of Greater Nancy.
  • Yvelines – City of Sartrouville.

From February 1, 2023

  • Dawn – Troyes Champagne Metropolis.
  • Corse du Sud and Haute-Corse – SYVADEC (Corsican Waste Recovery Union)
  • North – Dunkirk Grand Littoral.

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Natural disaster status for 78 municipalities in Var, Loire and Corsica https://val-de-moder.org/natural-disaster-status-for-78-municipalities-in-var-loire-and-corsica/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 11:37:28 +0000 https://val-de-moder.org/natural-disaster-status-for-78-municipalities-in-var-loire-and-corsica/ A state of natural disaster was issued to cover nearly 80 French municipalities, allowing owners to assert their insurance rights for damage caused by recent exceptional storms. This includes 73 municipalities in Corsica, which was hit last week by a sudden and violent storm that left five people dead. Read more: Corsica death toll rises […]]]>

A state of natural disaster was issued to cover nearly 80 French municipalities, allowing owners to assert their insurance rights for damage caused by recent exceptional storms.

This includes 73 municipalities in Corsica, which was hit last week by a sudden and violent storm that left five people dead.

Read more: Corsica death toll rises to five after shock storms

Read more: Fatal storm in Corsica: Why did the alerts come so late?

It also applies to two municipalities in the Var department, Hyères and Pradet, and to three localities in the Loire – Saint-Étienne, La Grand-Croix and Perreux.

French Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin today announced the natural disaster status in a tweet. He only mentioned two places in the Loire but La Connexion understands that the status has been granted to three places.

Why was a natural disaster declared in these municipalities?

France has a system in which the indemnities intended to cover the costs caused by a natural disaster are paid from a special fund, fed by the insurance companies and the State.

But for your insurance company to compensate you for this type of disaster, the government must officially declare that a natural disaster has occurred in the municipality where you live.

Once the decree has been published in the Official Journal, the persons concerned must file a complaint with their insurer within 10 days.

You can read more about how to make a claim in our article here: French ‘natural disaster’ insurance system: how to make a claim

Why were these municipalities chosen?

France faced a series of strong storms last week, but some regions were hit harder than others.

Read more: Hail, floods, winds of 224 km / h: Five dead as storms hit France

A deadly storm hit Corsica on the morning of August 18, bringing winds of over 200 km/h in places. It surprised meteorologists, who hadn’t expected it to hit so close to the island’s shores. Five people died in total.

An investigation has been opened to determine what went wrong.

Read more: Fatal storm in Corsica: Why did the alerts come so late?

Among the municipalities where a natural disaster has been declared is Calvi (Haute-Corse) where several bungalows were destroyed by the storm and a 45-year-old man was killed.

In the Var, in the south of France, a big storm shook the department on the night of August 16 to 17 and continued during the day.

Winds of up to 116 km / h were recorded and a hailstorm hit the department. The emergency services were called 39 times in the department during the storms.

Thunderstorms and hailstorms also hit the region of Saint-Étienne (Loire) on August 17. Images on social media showed parts of the city covered in a thick layer of hail.

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]]> See what water restrictions apply in your department https://val-de-moder.org/see-what-water-restrictions-apply-in-your-department/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 10:12:04 +0000 https://val-de-moder.org/see-what-water-restrictions-apply-in-your-department/ The French government has a system of alert levels to protect against the effects of drought, with various restrictions introduced depending on the severity. In this article we show the overall alert levels at departmental level, more localized maps to show possible alert levels in the communes and also break down what each alert level […]]]>

The French government has a system of alert levels to protect against the effects of drought, with various restrictions introduced depending on the severity.

In this article we show the overall alert levels at departmental level, more localized maps to show possible alert levels in the communes and also break down what each alert level means and what restrictions are in place.

General map of departmental alert

Our map below shows the general alert levels in each department, ranging from zero restrictions to code 4, or crisis level. This map is accurate as of August 24.

Please note that the municipalities of each department may have a different alert level from the general departmental level. While in one area the alert level might be code 1, in the next town it might be code 4. You can see a more detailed breakdown on the Propluvia drought alert website of the government here.

You can click the search icon at the top left of the map and type in your department name to highlight it.

Key:

  • No code – No restrictions
  • Code: 1 – warning (vigilance)
  • Code: 2 – alert (to alert)
  • Code: 3 – heightened alert (heightened alert)
  • Code: 4 – crisis (crisis)

The latest updates include:

  • Ardèche – Areas downgraded to ‘enhanced alert level’

Code 1: warning level

This is the lowest alert level.

  • Individuals and businesses are encouraged to reduce their water consumption, but it is not mandatory.
  • Information on reducing water use and drought management should be shared by local and county authorities – you can receive leaflets by post describing this.

The map below reflects the departments where code 1 alerts are in place in many communes.

Code 2: alert level

  • Bans could be introduced on watering gardens, green spaces or golf courses at certain times
  • Bans may be introduced on washing cars at certain times
  • Limits could be placed on the amount of water used to fill pools
  • The use of water for agricultural means is limited
  • Measures are in place to prohibit the opening of the valves

The map below reflects the departments where code 2 alerts are in place in many communes.

Code 3: heightened alert

  • Stricter limits on watering gardens, green spaces or golf courses and in some cases these acts are prohibited altogether
  • Stricter limits are placed on car washing and in some cases it is banned altogether
  • The use of water for agricultural means is still limited

The map below reflects the departments where code 3 alerts are in place in many communes.

Code 4: crisis

  • The use of water is authorized only for necessary needs, including for drinking, health, civil security, cleaning
  • No watering of gardens, green spaces or golf courses. There are sometimes exceptions for trees, shrubs and vegetable gardens at certain times
  • Ban on washing cars
  • Prohibition to fill swimming pools
  • Prohibition of water use for most agricultural practices

The map below reflects the departments where code alerts are in place in many communes.

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BayWa re to develop hybrid solar-storage-hydrogen project in France – pv magazine International https://val-de-moder.org/baywa-re-to-develop-hybrid-solar-storage-hydrogen-project-in-france-pv-magazine-international/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://val-de-moder.org/baywa-re-to-develop-hybrid-solar-storage-hydrogen-project-in-france-pv-magazine-international/ The Community of Communes of Haute-Saintonge on the mid-Atlantic coast of France has chosen BayWa re to develop an innovative hybrid project on the site of the Pôle Mécanique de la Haute Saintonge. August 23, 2022 Blake Matich BayWa re is currently working on a 40 MWp solar project with an annual production of 52 […]]]>

The Community of Communes of Haute-Saintonge on the mid-Atlantic coast of France has chosen BayWa re to develop an innovative hybrid project on the site of the Pôle Mécanique de la Haute Saintonge.

BayWa re is currently working on a 40 MWp solar project with an annual production of 52 GWh initially, coupled with an energy storage system. The capacity of the storage system was not specified. Eventually, the project will be used in the production of green hydrogen, via a partnership with Lhyfe.

France’s Lhyfe will develop the green hydrogen production side of the hybrid facility, which will use solar generation. According to BayWa re, there is a market for green hydrogen among manufacturers, local authorities, associations, schools, urban transport operators, all within a radius of 150 km around the site.

However, a year-long study of the potential for local use will be conducted before firm plans are made for the production of green hydrogen. BayWa re wants the local community to invest in the project during its development and to become a majority shareholder during the construction and operation phase.

“This project will be a model for regions that want to actively participate in the energy transition, in particular as an investment opportunity for local authorities,” said BayWa re France Managing Director Céline Tran.

French President Emmanuel Macron has made no secret of his country’s interest in green hydrogen, as it is one of the country’s development goals for 2030. Macron mainly wants to produce green hydrogen through nuclear energy, but there is still an opportunity for solar electrolysis.

With green hydrogen projects on hold for the short term, the real focus of the project is its solar storage potential. BayWa re said its solar-plus-storage hybrid will be able to integrate “optimally” into the grid, where it will “help secure electricity supply, especially during the winter peak period.”

BayWa re France’s Director of Innovation, Mathieu Bordeleau, said the company wants “this project to be a showcase of innovation in France that highlights the benefits of combining flexibility tools with the production of ‘renewable energy”. He added that the company is “undertakes to demonstrate (sic) the technical feasibility of the project, but also its economic relevance with regard to all the services provided.

This content is copyrighted and may not be reused. If you wish to cooperate with us and wish to reuse some of our content, please contact: editors@pv-magazine.com.

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France’s national parks warn visitors to respect flora and fauna https://val-de-moder.org/frances-national-parks-warn-visitors-to-respect-flora-and-fauna/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 11:06:29 +0000 https://val-de-moder.org/frances-national-parks-warn-visitors-to-respect-flora-and-fauna/ National parks in France are suffering from overcrowding, prompting authorities to expand an awareness campaign on how best to respect the environment. The Federation of Regional Natural Parks sounded the alarm after noting that too many visitors were putting the spaces at risk, especially as foreign tourists were starting to return following the pandemic. In […]]]>

National parks in France are suffering from overcrowding, prompting authorities to expand an awareness campaign on how best to respect the environment.

The Federation of Regional Natural Parks sounded the alarm after noting that too many visitors were putting the spaces at risk, especially as foreign tourists were starting to return following the pandemic.

In Occitania, in the south of France, 20% of the territory is covered with national parks, which extend over 583 municipalities. In total, there are 58 national parks (and natural areas considered worthy of similar protection) in France.

Country hikers are among those who advise paying particular attention to the protection of birds and small mammals and to respecting the flora.

Federation member Léa Chariol told France 3: “If your dog is off-leash on a hike, he can get off the trail and disturb ground-nesting birds or small mammals living in the natural area.

“As for the flora, the main problem is trampling it, if you don’t stay on the marked path, or if you pick flowers and berries.”

The federation has just launched a new campaign intended to alert tourists and local residents to the risks, and allow people to continue to visit the parks without risk to the environment. The campaign is intended to be light and catchy.

It includes 20 pictograms, which are now displayed in natural spaces. All have a colorful design and the instructions are based on well-known song lyrics. All the pictograms are visible on the federation website here.

They include warnings about:

  • Respect biodiversity
  • Do not pick berries or flowers
  • Do not move or disturb wild animals or birds
  • Keep your dog on a leash
  • Avoid starting fires
  • Take waste with you and do not leave it in the countryside
  • Keep dark (no light pollution)
  • Respect other users (such as bikes and hikers sharing the same path)
  • Drive slowly on the roads

Ms Chariol said: “The risk of fire is the big news this year, but not respecting signage is also a major risk. These small behaviors add up. When it comes to one person, it doesn’t really have an impact, but when there are dozens and dozens of people, it starts to cause problems.

The program was first tested last year in the Catalan Pyrenees, but now covers the whole of France. It is expected to extend to all of Occitania in particular, where two new national parks are being created.

Over the next 10 years, 884 municipalities in the region will be incorporated into national park areas.

It comes just days after managers of the Calanques National Park (Bouches-du-Rhône) warned hikers and other trail users not to build large “cairns” – small piles of pebbles or stones – the along paths or trails, as this could damage fragile ecosystems.

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See French departments with water restrictions https://val-de-moder.org/see-french-departments-with-water-restrictions/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://val-de-moder.org/see-french-departments-with-water-restrictions/ The French government has a system of alert levels to protect against the effects of drought, with various restrictions introduced depending on the severity. In this article we show the overall alert levels at departmental level, more localized maps to show possible alert levels in the communes and also break down what each alert level […]]]>

The French government has a system of alert levels to protect against the effects of drought, with various restrictions introduced depending on the severity.

In this article we show the overall alert levels at departmental level, more localized maps to show possible alert levels in the communes and also break down what each alert level means and what restrictions are in place.

General map of departmental alert

Our map below shows the general alert levels in each department, ranging from zero restrictions to code 4, or crisis level. This map is accurate as of August 18.

Please note that the municipalities of each department may have a different alert level from the general departmental level. While in one area the alert level might be code 1, in the next town it might be code 4. You can see a more detailed breakdown on the Propluvia drought alert website of the government here.

You can click the search icon at the top left of the map and type in your department name to highlight it.

Key:

  • No code – No restrictions
  • Code: 1 – warning (vigilance)
  • Code: 2 – alert (to alert)
  • Code: 3 – heightened alert (heightened alert)
  • Code: 4 – crisis (crisis)

The latest updates include:

  • Indre – Areas reclassified to “crisis level”
  • Finistère – Areas reclassified to “crisis level”
  • Sarthe – Areas reclassified to “crisis level”
  • Indre-et-Loire – Areas reclassified to “crisis level”
  • Charente-Maritime – Areas raised to “enhanced alert level”

Code 1: warning level

This is the lowest alert level.

  • Individuals and businesses are encouraged to reduce their water consumption, but it is not mandatory.
  • Information on reducing water use and drought management should be shared by local and county authorities – you can receive leaflets by post describing this.

The map below reflects the departments where code 1 alerts are in place in many communes.

Code 2: alert level

  • Bans could be introduced on watering gardens, green spaces or golf courses at certain times
  • Bans may be introduced on washing cars at certain times
  • Limits could be placed on the amount of water used to fill pools
  • The use of water for agricultural means is limited
  • Measures are in place to prohibit the opening of the valves

The map below reflects the departments where code 2 alerts are in place in many communes.

Code 3: heightened alert

  • Stricter limits on watering gardens, green spaces or golf courses and in some cases these acts are prohibited altogether
  • Stricter limits are placed on car washing and in some cases it is banned altogether
  • The use of water for agricultural means is still limited

The map below reflects the departments where code 3 alerts are in place in many communes.

Code 4: crisis

  • The use of water is authorized only for necessary needs, including for drinking, health, civil security, cleaning
  • No watering of gardens, green spaces or golf courses. There are sometimes exceptions for trees, shrubs and vegetable gardens at certain times
  • Ban on washing cars
  • Prohibition to fill swimming pools
  • Prohibition of water use for most agricultural practices

The map below reflects the departments where code alerts are in place in many communes.

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local feedback in France on the daily water limit of 150 liters https://val-de-moder.org/local-feedback-in-france-on-the-daily-water-limit-of-150-liters/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 12:18:23 +0000 https://val-de-moder.org/local-feedback-in-france-on-the-daily-water-limit-of-150-liters/ People in areas of southern France where water consumption has been limited to 200 liters per day per person generally said they did not notice the difference. Local authorities in nine communes in the south of the Var department have decided to impose limits due to a drought crisis which means that water reserves are […]]]>

People in areas of southern France where water consumption has been limited to 200 liters per day per person generally said they did not notice the difference.

Local authorities in nine communes in the south of the Var department have decided to impose limits due to a drought crisis which means that water reserves are running out.

The decision was taken last week by the town halls of all the municipalities called the Pays de Fayence, made up of the municipalities:

  • Cars in the forest
  • Callien
  • earthenware
  • Mons
  • Montauroux
  • Saint-Paul-en-Foret
  • Seillans
  • Tanneron
  • tourrettes

The 200 liters per day limit, which in some areas of Seillans is capped at 150 litres, is based on a 2020 study by the Observatory of Public Water Services which shows that the average person in France uses around 149 liters of water. fresh water per day.

“The 200-litre limit is high enough compared to our daily consumption,” said Anthony Massiera, a 38-year-old gardener who lives in Tourrettes.

He said that in his household of four, the average daily water consumption is 600 litres, or 150 liters per person.

Read more: French measures against drought: How much water do household appliances consume?

Mr Massiera added that the restriction seemed even more manageable as his property has a 12 meter deep shaft. He also said that his garden doesn’t require much maintenance.

Read more: How do French authorities inform people about water restrictions?

Jean-Marc Robart, a retired farmer who lives near Le Muy, which is not one of the municipalities subject to the restrictions, said he was not concerned by such a measure introduced by his town hall.

“I have been limiting my water consumption for 46 years already,” he said.

He added that he had a well and four water tanks located on his remote property.

Although he does not feel affected by the water restrictions, he said he has noticed the effects of the drought on the environment.

“I noticed that the cicadas arrived in mid-May and left around the beginning of August, a month earlier than expected due to the extreme drought,” he said.

Pierre Mouret, a 57-year-old psychiatrist residing in another Var town, Flayosc, said he was worried about the drying up of the neighboring lakes.

“I have never seen such low levels in my life,” he said, referring to Lake Serre-Ponçon and Lake Sainte-Croix.

But he said that in discussions with fellow psychiatrists living in Hyères, the issue of water restrictions never arises because it does not concern them.

He said he stopped going to local golf clubs after learning they were still watering their greens.

“It makes no sense,” he said.

Crackdown on rule breakers

Bernard Henry, the mayor of Fayence, one of the communes where the limit is in place, posted a statement on Facebook on July 27 saying the commune would crack down on people exceeding the 200-litre limit.

Those who break the rules risk a fine of €1,500, which can reach €3,000 in the event of a repeat offence.

“We are going to intensify the checks [people’s] daily or weekly [water] consumption by targeted or random meter readings and we will enforce the law and fine it to its fullest extent,” he wrote.

He said people caught breaking the limit could have a “pill” installed in their home, which is a type of filter that can reduce water flow.

Read more: French homes subject to drought rule checks

Mr Massiera said he saw several helicopters hovering over the area and says he suspects they are being used to survey swimming pools or spot gardens with strangely lush green grass.

The town hall of Draguignan in the Var has reported receiving calls from people reporting excessive water consumption by their neighbors.

Another interlocutor of The Connexion, who lives in the Alpes-Maritimes, in the neighboring Var, said he knew several people who had received calls from the French Office for Biodiversity (OFB) asking them to reduce their water consumption. .

He said these people all had swimming pools.

The OFB said it had carried out 4,000 checks related to drought restriction rules since May.

Among these controls, 400 gave rise to “procedures”, which can range from an official warning to a fine.

Many checks were probably carried out on larger scale businesses, factories or farms, but many more were on private homes.

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How much water do household appliances consume? https://val-de-moder.org/how-much-water-do-household-appliances-consume/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 10:41:15 +0000 https://val-de-moder.org/how-much-water-do-household-appliances-consume/ [Article updated August 5 at 13:30 with comments from France’s ecological transition minister.] France is currently facing a drought crisis, with nearly every department introducing some sort of water restriction rules. The Minister for Ecological Transition, Christophe Béchu, said today that more than 100 municipalities are now without drinking water and must depend on deliveries […]]]>

[Article updated August 5 at 13:30 with comments from France’s ecological transition minister.]

France is currently facing a drought crisis, with nearly every department introducing some sort of water restriction rules.

The Minister for Ecological Transition, Christophe Béchu, said today that more than 100 municipalities are now without drinking water and must depend on deliveries by truck.

He added: “We’re going to have to get used to episodes like this. Adapting is not an option, it’s an obligation, there’s no doubt about that.”

In the Var, in the south of France, the authorities of nine municipalities have gone further by introducing a daily limit on water consumption of between 150 and 200 liters per person.

The decision was taken last week by the town halls of all the municipalities called the Pays de Fayence, made up of the municipalities:

  • Bagnols in the Forest
  • Callien
  • earthenware
  • Mons
  • Montauroux
  • Saint-Paul-en-Foret
  • Seillans
  • Tanneron
  • tourrettes

Read more: 60 French departments have ‘crisis’ drought alerts as heat continues

Read more: Vigilance, alert, crisis: what the four drought alerts mean in France

The average person in France uses around 149 liters of fresh water per day, according to a 2020 study by the Observatory of Public Water Services.

But the town hall in Fayence, one of the towns where a limit is in place, admitted to being inundated with calls from residents asking what exactly 200 liters of water use looks like.

Mayor Bernard Henry posted a statement on Facebook on July 27 saying the commune would crack down on people exceeding the 200-litre limit.

Those who break the rules risk a fine of €1,500, which can reach €3,000 in the event of a repeat offence.

“We are going to intensify the checks [people’s] daily or weekly [water] consumption by targeted or random meter readings and we will enforce the law and fine it to its fullest extent,” he wrote.

He said people caught breaking the limit might have a ‘tablet‘ installed in their homes, which is a type of filter that can reduce the flow of water.

The town hall of Bagnols-en-Forêt has instead turned to Facebook to try to give people an idea of ​​the water consumption of each household appliance.

They’ve also added a link to an online tool that allows you to approximate your annual water consumption, which you can see here.

Read more: Annecy, Lyon, Avignon: The French cities most threatened by the rise in heat

How much water does each household appliance use?

About 93% of fresh water in France is used for hygiene or cleaning purposes, says the Water Information Center.

Bagnols-en-Forêt town hall said water for drinking and cooking represents a “negligible” amount of the average person’s water consumption.

Bathroom

An average bath uses 175 liters of water, according to French water management company Veolia.

A standard shower uses around 12 to 20 liters per minute, which means that a three minute shower could use around 60 litres, while a six minute shower would use 120 litres.

A bathroom sink uses about 12 liters of water per minute, while a toilet flush uses between five and 18 liters per flush, depending on the age and efficiency of the model.

Bagnols-en-Forêt town hall said that with each person going to the toilet an average of four times a day, a family of four could end up using between 50 and 100 liters of water a day just by flushing the toilet. hunt.

Kitchen

A very efficient dishwasher will use around 20 liters per cycle, while a less efficient model could use up to 40 litres.

Washing the dishes by hand consumes about 12 liters for a person living alone. Doing the dishes for a family will consume a lot more.

Laundry

A highly efficient washing machine will use around 60 liters of water per cycle, while a less economical model could use up to 120 liters, according to the Water Information Center.

Garden

The amount of water needed to maintain a garden obviously varies depending on the size of the garden and the type of vegetation in it. Veolia indicates that the average quantity used to water a garden in France is approximately 540 liters of water.

The town hall of Bagnols-en-Forêt indicates that a pipe consumes 1,000 liters per hour.

As for swimming pools, an average swimming pool needs 50,000 liters of water to fill it.

Read more: People in south-west France can’t water gardens for three months

Tips for limiting water consumption

The town hall of Bagnols-en-Forêt offers the following advice to residents to reduce their water consumption.

  • Cover your pool to limit evaporation, filter and treat the water regularly to reuse it for several years
  • For the vegetable garden, hoe and mulch the soil to a good thickness, shade the area, favor drip irrigation, cultivate species that consume little water, recover rainwater
  • Stop watering other plants and let them manage themselves
  • Try to take short showers
  • Install a water-efficient flushing system on your toilet
  • Regularly check your water meter to see if you are consuming too much

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